Corners of my garden

covered bench

I love our garden. It’s not huge, but it is wild.  A developer would probably split it up and add another house, but not while we are here. I know where they would build and our mining bees already assume that that patch is their home. There will be no building there in our time.

garden roller

Most of the garden is left open, so that children and dogs can run and cycle around, but over the years I’ve cultivated corners of the garden. The garden wraps round the house. Trees and shrubs block the view to other parts. You cannot see one corner from the another. It has the effect of making garden rooms and space for all the family.

clementis fig and shadows

My covered bench (first photo) is where I like to start the morning to put together my to-do list. The clementis is starting to open. The leaves of the fig tree beside it seem to grow by the hour. I love the shadows they throw on the wall in the morning. I can sit there and no-one will spot me, even though I am in plain view.

ceanothus

In another corner of the garden, I planted a new ceanothus in the area where my willow tree, dogwood and dog rose dominate. This year it is beginning to prove its right to be there.tamarix

Not everyone likes the tamarix. It seems to be from the same gardening era as pampus grass, sumacs and small conifers. We had them all in the garden when we moved in. I love the dusky pink cloud that the tamarix makes. Even for a short time. So it has stayed. (Don’t talk to my husband about pampus grass and sumacs) My children love to climb the tree. We used to have two, but the other made way for our swinging bench. A compromise.

apple blossom

This time of year is about promise in the garden. All our fruit trees are blossoming. The deer has munched the young growth from our early apple tree. Just on one side, so I’m hoping it doesn’t realise that there is another side. (I know. How do we have wild deer and deerhounds in the same garden?)

This weekend I need to tidy a few more corners of the garden. Might be presentable for a photo or two. Who knows!

rose chaffer or goldsmith beetle

Finally, as anyone who knows me well will tell you, I should have been an entomologist or an ecologist, if only the career adviser had mentioned it. I love the insects that we find in the garden. I stalk them relentlessly with my camera. Losing time. (Child: “Is it supper time yet?” Me:”No, another hour.”) This one is a rose chaffer or goldsmith beetle. Just beautiful. It is currently feasting on the pollen from our woad plants. If you see one say hello. Their larvae are a brilliant soil aerator. As good as earthworms.

Joining the corners of my garden in with the most pretty linky I’ve ever come across – Mammasaurus’ How Does Your Garden Grow.

21 thoughts on “Corners of my garden

  • Thursday 15 May, 2014 at 12:43 pm
    Permalink

    Your garden looks lovely. Great pictures too 😛

    • Thursday 15 May, 2014 at 12:50 pm
      Permalink

      Thanks. I think I’m finally admitting to myself that my garden is more about grow-your-own and encouraging the wildlife, rather than keeping up with the Joneses.

  • Thursday 15 May, 2014 at 1:36 pm
    Permalink

    I love your garden

    • Thursday 15 May, 2014 at 2:16 pm
      Permalink

      Me too!

  • Thursday 15 May, 2014 at 1:38 pm
    Permalink

    That beetle is impressive. Totally worth delaying tea for, I think! And I love your clematis shot – I have one like that, too.

    • Thursday 15 May, 2014 at 2:16 pm
      Permalink

      It’s still feeding away on the pollen. I can see it from my desk. We have a lot of woad, so it may never leave.

    • Thursday 15 May, 2014 at 6:10 pm
      Permalink

      I think the peacefulness of it is the part that I love the most.

    • Thursday 15 May, 2014 at 11:22 pm
      Permalink

      He is rather splendid. 🙂

    • Thursday 15 May, 2014 at 11:25 pm
      Permalink

      You are so kind, Merlinda. I’m enjoying this little beetle visiting the woad.

  • Friday 16 May, 2014 at 10:30 am
    Permalink

    😎 Nice garden! Wild is the way forward for sure, better for wildlife and bugs and easier to manage too. Such pretty photos, I feel like I am nosing about right there (obviously don’t fear I’m not stood in the corner of your garden like a nutter)

    Thanks for joining in again you lovely lady (and for the kind words) x

    • Friday 16 May, 2014 at 2:17 pm
      Permalink

      Hee! Hee! Probably wouldn’t see you if you chose a really wild corner. Far better to try out one of the benches. More likely to be offered tea.

  • Friday 16 May, 2014 at 9:57 pm
    Permalink

    Your garden sounds and looks positively dreamy! We found a HUGE beetle today. Well I thought it was huge anyway. Alas, it was dead, and I thought about collecting it for interests purposes, but was a wimp to pick it up and carry it in my bare hands on the school run. It was hairy too! Thinking about it, there were quite a few smaller beetles out today too. Must have been enjoying the weather.

    • Friday 16 May, 2014 at 11:53 pm
      Permalink

      I think they are enjoying the weather. I’ve started taking photos on my phone to identify insect later. Saves the dilemma of what to do with the dead beetle afterwards. Our nature table gets very full otherwise. Worst thing I’ve brought back in my bare hands from the school run was a dead mole. I always carry my phone now. 😀

  • Saturday 17 May, 2014 at 11:23 am
    Permalink

    our garden is small too, but small really can be beautiful. I love that you have what looks like a nice old wall in your garden x

    • Saturday 17 May, 2014 at 12:10 pm
      Permalink

      You’re right. Small can be beautiful. I have one small area fenced off where I have my salad in raised beds and any precious plants. It is kept dog free.I’m learning to make a lot from that little space.

  • Wednesday 28 May, 2014 at 11:17 pm
    Permalink

    your garden is so lovely!
    thanks for sharing!

    • Thursday 29 May, 2014 at 12:36 am
      Permalink

      Thanks. I daren’t show the areas that are in desperate need of weeding!

  • Pingback: Hestercombe Gardens - Mammasaurus

Comments are closed.

RSS
Follow by Email
Twitter
Pinterest
Pinterest
fb-share-icon
Instagram