Welcome to our blog.

..... We make
..... We explore
..... We nuture

Three children *** Two dogs *** Two parents *** Country loving *** Cottage dwelling in the South-West of the UK. That's us!

We've been blogging since January 2010.

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Just a thought….

"A moment spent in wonder is worth a lifetime spent in awe."

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Life

Thank you….

  • Louise Houghton Fantastic. I often am in a state of indecision regarding our black refuse bag. We always burn a lot in the winter in the Rayburn... 23 Apr
  • Kim Carberry Ahh! How lovely! It sounds like you have had a fab week. That church looks fantastic. Well done x #WotW 21 Apr
  • Anne How lovely that you have had time to re-charge. It sounds like you've had a lovely week. I love your daughters church, very creative. #wotw 21 Apr
  • The Reading Residence Your analogy about recharging is so true and I've never really thought of it like that before. Food for thought. I love looking round old... 21 Apr
  • Stephanie Robinson What a fabulous post - and a gorgeous quilt - and yes hindsight, it gets us every time but great advice in this post -... 20 Apr
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Time to smile

"God has an inordinate fondness for stars and beetles."

- J B S Haldane

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history

Recharge

Have you ever noticed how a tech gadget recharges faster if you don’t use it at the same time? Or software downloads in no time, if you’re not googling cookie recipes? A page loads in seconds, if you’re not flicking to other apps? It’s the same with us humans. We recharge so much quicker if we’re not multi-tasking. This week, I’ve done just that. Apart from an hour sending out emails, I’ve switched off work.

A chance to rediscover how much I love to pin and cut out fabric ready for sewing. Using my hands to make something real. Using my old, hand cranked, Singer, sewing machine to stitch up pyjamas. Slow, but that is good. It’s easy to concentrate on the finishing line and forget to enjoy the journey.

There have been walks and bike rides. Spotting the changing season. Books read. Games played. Eggs hunted.

A visit to a church. After a busy day in the garden, we had lunch at a pub near Cheddar, to recharge. Followed by picking up strawberries from our favourite roadside stall. We were happily munching the strawberries, overlooking the Somerset Levels, when we spotted a church.

Making a model of a church is on the list of homework to complete, so we decided to do a bit of research. Wrong era, as it turned out. When we went in, we found a team of lovely, friendly people getting the church ready for the Easter service. First time I’ve ever been offered a broom on entering a church!

We were so lucky, as one of the busy helpers took us on a tour of the church. Pointing out features we would have overlooked and telling us the history. The children loved it. Soaking in all the information. They discussed so many points on the way home in the car.

We were really struck at how the scene in the church would have been repeated for the last five hundred years. Cleaning the church before the Easter service.

It may have been the wrong era, but it gave a boost of energy to her history homework.

Wednesday we headed to Wells for school essentials. I popped into my favourite charity shop (OK, I have several favourites.) I’m on a hunt for interesting egg cups at the moment. While there, I spotted a clutch of biscuit cutters. There is one here that really caught my attention. Not quite showing, but I’m sure I’ll be posting up the results soon.

I’ve not baked biscuits for a while. Finding the cutters refired my enthusiasm.

The coming week and next is going to be very busy. I’m really glad I had time to recharge. Not just me. I know the children have too. They have busy terms ahead of them.

It’s not quite over yet. Still time to stock up on a bit more fun. I’d say “make hay while the sun shines”, but slightly too early for that.

The Reading Residence
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Revisiting Stonehenge, again

Years ago, I lived near Stonehenge. It was one of those places that we visited regularly. Especially when friends came to stay. One of the advantages of being local, was that you knew the best time to visit. I’m not sure if it was a well kept secret, but during the winter months, on one day a week, you could go right up to the stones. No barriers.

(My mother and my two sisters in the middle of Stonehenge – December 1984)

There was a little wooden shed among the stones, which an official sheltered from the weather and was on hand to answer questions. I guess also to make sure we didn’t damage the old stones. I think that is snow in the background.

This was Stonehenge to me.

Years later, I visited the stones again, with my husband, over several summer solstices. Carrying a babe in a sling and holding tight to the hand of our toddler. Again, we could go right up to the stones. It was a different experience. Instead of a few hardy locals, now the stones were thronging with masses of people and noise. Drums, singing and horns. Everyone waiting for the sun to rise. It was different, to say the least, but the stones were still the stones.

It has been a few years, but this weekend we took all three children to Stonehenge. First time we had seen the new visitor centre. Very different. We parked up and headed to the centre. It is run by English Heritage. National Trust and English Heritage members can go in free. The £5 parking fee is waived too. It is refunded for everyone when they buy the entrance ticket to the site.

There is a fleet of shuttle buses that must spend all day, busing people to and from the centre to the stones. Alternatively, you can walk the 1 and a half miles, as we did, over the Stonehenge Landscape route.

It became a competition. Who would see Stonehenge first. The younger two raced each other. It was so funny watching them. Every now and again, they would try to push the other one off the path, to gain an advantage. I don’t think they noticed how far we walked, or ran, in their case. I think this is the best way to reach the Stones.

A low rope fence shows visitors where to walk, but is ground hugging enough not to intrude on the view. We walked around the stones, but never among them. There were a lot of people going round, but not enough to feel crowded. No problem getting a family photo in front of the stones.

I couldn’t help chuckling at how many people walked around with their backs to the stones. Taking selfies of themselves in front of the stones. That was different. I wonder if they turned round and saw them for real.

Back at the visitors’ centre, we went round the museum which gives a wonderful surround experience as if you are standing in the middle of the stones, through the ages. Going back, to see it with all the stones in place. Also artifacts dug up. Setting the scene.  Answering questions.

Including how many friends you would need to bring along to help you move one of those great, big stones.

I loved going back again. It was different, but the stones were still the stones.

I’ll go again, I’m sure. We will probably drag the children back to see the sunrise sometime soon, for the summer Solstice, because everyone needs to do that once. Or maybe more.

Linking up to #CountryKids. Have you been out and about recently?

Country Kids


 

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Photos

There have been cases when people lifted my photos and words, and used them without credit to me or asking permission first. Using them for their own commercial gain. I have now added a level of security to deter people from doing this. Apologies to people who do play nicely. If you would like to use any of my photos, please contact me.

Copyright notice:

All my words and photos are copyrighted to me. They cannot be used for commercial benefit by anyone else. If you would like to use any of them, then please ask me first and don't just take. Written permission only. Don't pass my words, photos or ideas off as your own. It's not nice.